Posts Tagged ‘poppy seeds’

Ever since I met Joel, we have celebrated the Jewish holidays… Rosh Hashanah, Passover, Chanukah. But of course there are many more, including Purim. A traditional dish for Purim is hamantaschen cookies, which are triangular shaped cookies, that resemble a hat, and are filled with poppy seeds as well as fruit jams. I was surprised to learn about the poppy seed filling tradition… poppy seeds are used in traditional Romanian cooking and baking too, especially for Christmas. I love all the similarities that I discover about the Romanian and Jewish traditions. There are more than I have ever imagined.


My favorite hamantaschen cookies have always been the fruit filled ones, specifically the prune filled. I must admit that I have not seen any poppy seed filled cookies at the local Jewish bakery or the grocery store. Not sure why that is. Also, I have always wanted to make them, but the recipes that I have found did not appeal to me, since most of them require a ton of dairy… butter, cream cheese, and/or sour cream.

My friend Mark and I were chatting the other day and he asked me if I was planning on making the cookies since Purim is this week. I explained my recipe dilemma to him. But then I got inspired and decided to search for a non-dairy recipe. After reading through the search results on Food52, I found the perfect recipe! I also thought that it would be fun to make the cookies with Julia, since she loves to help me bake.


The dough recipe is super simple… it requires flour, baking powder, salt, a bit of water, vegetable oil, eggs, and sugar. You mix the dry ingredients in a bowl, then you mix the wet ingredients in another bowl, and then you mix the dry ingredients into the wet ingredients until a thick dough forms. Lastly, you knead the dough a bit to bring it together into a ball, cut it in half, and then form two disks. The caveat was that you had to let the dough chill for at least 3 hours or overnight, so Julia and I made the dough first thing in the morning and then continued with the rest 3 hours later.

Although the recipe included the chocolate poppy seed filling, I really wanted to use prune jam and apricot jam, since I love both flavors. Also, my mom gave me a few jars of her home-made prune jam, so I thought that it was the perfect opportunity to use some of it. As I was grabbing the prune jam, I realized that I forgot to buy the apricot jam. But then I remembered that my mom also gave me a jar of her home-made peach jam, so I decided to use that instead. The cookies came out delicious!


I do have a few things to share about the recipe…

I, of course, cut the sugar… I cut it from 1/2 a cup to a 1/3 of a cup and the cookies were plenty sweet. I also added a teaspoon of vanilla since I like the flavor. I did not have to add any extra water since the dough seemed good.

The recipe suggests rolling the dough to an 1/8 inch thickness. I found this to be too thin when shaping the cookies. Having the dough slightly thicker made shaping them much easier. Also, the folding technique explained did not make any sense to me, so I just pinched the circle in 3 spots, which still resembled the traditional cookie shape.


A few of my cookies did loose their shape during baking. After talking to my sister, I found out that she had the same issue when she baked some and she used a different recipe/dough. I do not feel too terrible about it, since they still taste good. I wonder how the cookies that are sold at the grocery store come out so perfectly-shaped… they must have a bunch of discards. I am picturing the bakers enjoying them.. I hope. Ha!


I am glad that I finally gave these cookies a try. I would definitely make them again, even though they were a bit time consuming. It is also a nice tradition to start with Julia. Happy Purim!!


Read Full Post »

A couple of months ago, my parents told me that they were thinking about going to visit my brother for Christmas… they live in Boulder, CO. I was so sad! I have spent every Christmas with my parents… only one time we were not together. And then I thought about the Christmas Eve dinner… my mom and I always make the traditional Romanian dinner together and I have never actually made any of the dishes on my own. I could not have Christmas Eve without the traditional dinner! I asked my mom to write the recipes for me so I could make them.

The dinner includes 7 dishes. It seemed a bit overwhelming to make all of them, especially since some are pretty time consuming. I decided to make my favorites… grâu, bob, and colțunași. I also debated about making the smoked fish dish, but decided on making a simple fish instead. And I did have a helper… sort of.

Grâu means wheat in Romanian. The dish is made with this wheat, which my mom found at a local Greek store. She experimented with a few over the years and the current one seems the best.


You have to soak it in boiling water over night, then you change the water, let it come to a boil, and then bake it in the oven for about an hour. Once baked, you add sugar, finely chopped walnuts, and poppy seeds. My mom also adds chopped walnuts, but I forgot to buy some so I did not add it. I actually liked it better without the chopped walnuts.


Bob is pretty much just fava beans. You sauté onions and garlic with some salt and pepper, then you add the drained fava beans, and sauté until all of the liquid is absorbed. My sister mentioned that she skinned the fava beans before cooking them, so I tried that. It was kind of a pain to do, but perhaps it did help with the digestion.


Colţunaşi, which means dumplings in Romanian, is definitely my favorite dish from this dinner. I look forward to it all year. They are super tasty but also the most labor intensive. I have been helping my mom make them for years. The most labor intensive part is rolling the dough and actually pinching them. It would take my mom and I hours to make. We had an assembly type line in her kitchen… my dad would roll the dough, my mom would cut the squares and fill them, and I would pinch them. We would make anywhere from 200 to almost 300 of them. Crazy, no!?! :) Then one year, one of us bought my mom the pasta attachment for her Kitchen Aid mixer. That was the best gift ever! It cut our colţunaşi making time in more than half.

The dough is very simple… flour, salt, a bit of oil, and water. The filling includes finely chopped granny smith apple that is mixed with poppy seeds. To finish them off, you add some sautéed onions on top and mix them. I made 84 colţunaşi this year. I think that it took me about an hour to make them, so it was not too bad.


The traditional dinner also includes two types of fish dishes. Both include lots of onions and a bunch of smoked and non-smoked fishes. I decided not to make them. Instead, I got some Mahi Mahi filets, but I was unsure exactly what to do with them. After a quick text with my brother, he told me to sauté some onion, add a few lemon slices to the pan, add the fish filets, pour a bit of white wine, put the lid on the pan, and cook them for a bit until done. And that is what I did. :) It was super tasty!


Our friend Yokko joined us for dinner. She brought a Cauli Cream Spinach dish, which was tasty and it went really well with the rest of the dinner.


I am proud to say that the dishes were a success! I must admit that I was kind of stressed out about making them. I was unsure if they would come out as good as my mom’s. I was also worried about ruining the dinner… that would have been a bummer, especially since my parents were not around either.


Merry Christmas… or La Multi Ani, as we say it in Romanian. It was also the first day of Chanukah, so Happy Chanukah!! :)



Read Full Post »

%d bloggers like this: